Most employees still feel pressure from work to answer emails and take phone calls while driving

Despite all we know about the dangers of driving distracted, the National Safety Council in the United States has just released results of a survey that show 54 per cent of drivers drive distracted because of work-related pressures. Nearly half (45 per cent) feel pressure from work to respond to emails while driving, followed by answering a phone call (38 per cent) and responding to a text (34 per cent).

However, the most pressure comes from drivers’ own families, with eight in 10 (82 per cent) of the respondents citing family pressures as a reason for driving distracted.

Distracted driving kills. Don’t become a statistic.

  • 25 per cent of all motor-vehicle fatalities in BC are related to distracted driving
  • 81 people die every year due to distracted driving
  • It is the second leading cause of crash fatalities in the province.1

What you can do

If you are an employer, supervisor or manager of people who drive for work, here is a four-step action plan to reduce the pressure your employees might feel to drive distracted:

  • Develop and implement a clearly-worded distracted driving policy
  • Make sure your employees know the policy and follow it
  • Share these tips with your employees
  • Lead by example

While driving hands-free is legal in BC, multiple studies have found that it is no safer than driving with a hand-held phone.

To reduce your risk and reduce the family pressures that cause distracted driving:

  • Create family rules about distracted driving
  • Make a commitment to turning off your phone when you drive
  • Make sure your family, friends and work colleagues know you don’t answer the phone when you drive

1 ICBC Driver Distraction and Cellphone Use, February 2016.

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Most employees still feel pressure from work to answer emails and take phone calls while driving